The cost of access to JR

Public Law Project (PLP) Legal Director Alison Pickup gave a talk on the cost barriers to accessing judicial review at the Bonavero Institute of Human Rights conference earlier this year. Alison’s talk focussed on the importance of introducing special costs rules for judicial review as a way of improving access to justice and the ability…

Quick and Uneasy Justice

PLP has now finished phase one of its settled status research project. The first phase of research aimed to model how the scheme is designed, and to provide a detailed analysis of its possible strengths and weaknesses. The findings of this first phase of research are written up in a report by PLP’s Research Director…

Home Office told to clear names of men convicted for historic gay sex offences

In the run up to this year’s London Pride, Public Law Project (PLP) renewed calls on the Home Secretary to clear the names of men convicted for the historic gay sex offence of ‘importuning’. In a letter to the Home Office on behalf of veteran gay rights campaigner Terry Stewart, PLP has demanded that the…

The cost of access to justice

Is the Government serious about access to justice? A new blog by PLP’s Deputy Legal Director Sara Lomri explains why access to judicial review is for most people now a distant reality and why the latest costs consultation suggests that the Government is ignoring the financial obstacles that prevent people from challenging unlawful decision-making. She…

Opening Address Discrimination law for public lawyers

Our equality laws are fragile – Dame Laura Cox QC Former Justice of the High Court, Dame Laura Cox DBE opened the Public Law Project’s inaugural Discrimination Law conference this week by sharing her view on why our equality laws are still fragile nearly ten years on from the 2010 Equality Act. Dame Laura’s wide-ranging…

PLP response to FRC consultation

PLP’s response outlines why the Government’s indication that it will not consult on extending QOCS or the Aarhus rules is cause for concern, and why relying on CCOs to mitigate access to justice concerns is inadequate.  PLP is gravely concerned that the Government is giving insufficient priority to the principle of access to justice and…

Do benefit sanctions breach Article 3 ECHR?

One of PLP’s five strategic focus areas is benefit sanctioning. We are particularly concerned with the lawfulness of sanctioning and the effect this has on marginalised people. In this article PLP solicitor Sarah Clarke considers whether benefit sanctioning, particularly for people who are not well enough to work, could constitute inhuman and degrading treatment in…

PLP is recruiting an Administrative Paralegal

This is a fantastic opportunity to join a unique, award winning legal charity and NGO based in Central London. PLP is a national legal charity founded in 1990 with the mission to improve access to justice for those facing poverty, discrimination or other disadvantage, through legal aid casework, research, policy initiatives and training. The casework…

PLP is recruiting a Chair of Trustees

Public Law Project (PLP) is seeking an exceptional candidate to be our new Chair of Trustees. This is an outstanding opportunity to oversee a dynamic, growing and highly respected UK charity. PLP’s work results in the successful enforcement of individual rights as well as wider improvements in access to justice for disadvantaged or marginalised individuals…

PLP is recruiting an Operations Officer

PLP is recruiting a full-time Operations Officer. PLP Operations Officers play an essential role in achieving Public Law Project’s (PLP) charitable objectives through ensuring the effective running of financial, office, personnel and technical administrative operations of the charity. The role would suit someone looking to become a charity administrator, who enjoys working as part of…

Using the law to address unfair systems

The Public Law Project’s (PLP) collaborative approach to public law has featured in a case study of the landmark legal challenge to the personal independence payments scheme, a case that changed the assessment criteria for thousands of people on disability benefits. The research carried out by Dr Lisa Vanhala and Dr Jacqui Kinghan of UCL…

High Court suspends Home Office’s migrant removal policy

Following the judgment reached in the interim review of the Home Office’s ‘no-notice’ removals window policy on 14th March 2019, the solicitor in the case (PLP’s Rakesh Singh) gave a written interview to LexisNexis on the case and the judgment. The article can be read in full here. For more details about the case, please…